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Support System

Support System

"I can't promise to fix all your problems, but I can promise you won't have to face them all alone." It's hard to not ignore the attempt of friends making their best efforts to fix you, to solve the problem. When we love someone, it's easy to believe we are of best use to that person by helping them figure out what is wrong. We can easily become blind to what is most powerful in helping a person with a mental illness, for that matter, any illness.  Is to be by their side.  The experience of pain and healing is for that person to feel.  And loved ones can be of most help by taking care of themselves and letting their loved one know: I...

"I can't promise to fix all yo...

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Bring Change 2 Mind

stigma of mental illness

Mental illness is just that: Illness. We often forget that. There is always suffering with pain, but with the type of anguish that mental illness brings, pain takes on a sometimes more sinister feeling. I might suffer some pain if I break my leg, but it will eventually heal and I will walk again without agony. It’s not the same with those of us with “broken” brains. Our brains frequently try to kill us. Our brains tell us messages that are hurtful and scary; or they tell us things that are ridiculous and fabulous, designed to make us behave outlandishly or insanely. We can’t heal our brains and we can’t replace them with new ones. We’re stuck with them. Our...

Mental illness is just that: I...

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LIVING WITH DEPRESSION

Comment on Article

Article Comment: "I was married to someone who periodically falls into depression, and for years and years I walked on eggshells trying not to upset him or say the wrong thing.  Then one day, when my father was in critical condition, he chose to get terribly down about something very minor, and I realized that I was actually hiding my sadness so that I wouldn't make him even MORE depressed.  And I realized-- though I didn't know what to do about it-- that his minor feelings about his trivial problem (he'd misplaced his glasses) was considered far more important to both of us than my own grief about my father's impending death. No one ever says this, so I will. Depression makes...

Article Comment: "I was mar...

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WHO IS DEPRESSED

What Not to Say to a depressed person

I found this great article about what NOT to say to someone who is living with depression and the alternative suggestions.  It is worth visiting the link and reading the article in full so you can understand WHY.  Thanks for taking the time to research and learn how to care for your loved one who is depressed.  It takes courage, knowledge, patience and love to do so. ♥ Which piece of advice will most likely cheer up a clinically depressed person? A. “Pull yourself together.” B. “Look on the bright side.” C. “Don’t worry. It’s nothing serious.” The answer: None of the above. Such statements probably will make a depressed mate or friend feel worse. “Snap out of it.” Better to say: “I’ve noticed you haven’t been sleeping well...

I found this great article abo...

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DEPRESSION IN RELATIONSHIPS

Is Depression in your Relationship ?

Depression in relationships takes a toll on both parties.  Here's some great advice on what to do when Depression is in your relationship.   Remember, your role is to offer support and encourage your loved one to seek professional help.  Encourage your partner not to settle for partial improvement and explain that with the right treatment, people with depression can regain their lives. Although you may be prepared to do anything and everything to help, don’t try to take over the life of someone who is depressed. Your loved one may seem overwhelmed, incapable, or frustrated, but you can’t reconstruct his or her life. Give advice in the form of options. For example, recommend a physician for your partner to see or suggest support...

Depression in relationships ta...

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HELP WITH ANXIETY

Help with Anxiety

How to help with anxiety of your loved one/family member: Be predictable, don't surprise them. If you say you are going to meet them somewhere at a certain time, be there. If you agree to respond to a certain anxious habit in a certain way, stick to the plan. Don't assume that you know what the affected person needs, ask them. Make a mutual plan about how to fight the anxiety problem. Let the person with the disorder set the pace for recovery. Its going to take months to change avoidance patterns, expect slow but increasingly difficult goals to be attempted. Find something positive in every attempt at progress. If the affected person is only able to go part way to a particular goal,...

How to help with anxiety of yo...

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MENTAL DISORDER

Mental Disorder

Do's & Don'ts in helping your loved one with a mental disorder. DO'S Communication: 1. Be respectful and calm. 2. Stick to one topic at a time. 3. Keep a positive attitude. 4. Be honest with yourself and with your family member. 5. Use humor (when appropriate). 6. Communicate openly and often with the doctors. Building family member’s self-esteem: 1. Work together to create short-term goals. 2. Stay active – plan and engage in activities together. 3. Genuinely praise and compliment your loved one frequently, even for day- to- day behaviors. Dealing with difficult behavior: 1. Accept the fact that the consumer has a legitimate illness. 2. Set and discuss clear limits, rules and expectations for the family member’s behavior. 3. Be consistent and predictable. 4. Keep a log of your loved one’s symptoms, response to various...

Do's & Don'ts in helping y...

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