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Co occuring

Co-occuring / Dual Diagnosis

Co-occurring Disorders and Dual Diagnosis Often times, there is a connection between alcohol and drug abuse and a mental disorder. While this is not always true, many people who enter rehab find that they must be treated appropriately for each condition. Alcohol and drug abuse are often associated with these mental disorders: Depression Schizophrenia Anxiety disorders Personality disorders There are times when the alcohol or drug abuse occurs first. Over a period of time, substance abuse can result in mental and emotional problems. There are also times when the mental problem occurs first. Subsequently, this can cause a person to turn to alcohol or drugs in an attempt to feel better. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, it is essential for both conditions to be...

Co-occurring Disorders and Dua...

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List of Drugs

List of Drugs in Addiction

Common illicit drugs: Bath salts: A fairly new synthetic powder, typically containing the stimulant cathinone, that can be 10 times as potent as cocaine. Highly dangerous from the first use, with violent or psychotic behavior as regular side effects, and multiple deaths reported. Cocaine: White powdery stimulant, usually snorted through the nose to induce a short, powerful rush of energy and euphoria. Highly addictive, and the second-most popular illicit substance on the market. Crack: Also known as freebase cocaine, this is a crystallized form of coke designed to be smoked. It is highly addictive. Crystal meth: Slang term for methamphetamine, a notoriously addictive stimulant that is sold as an odorless yet bitter-tasting white powder. Provide a short, intense euphoric feeling after being snorted, swallowed,...

Common illicit drugs: Bath sa...

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addiction prevention

Addiction Prevention

"When students are educated on the “big picture” of drug use and abuse, they are better prepared to make responsible decisions on drug use in their own lives." Quoted from Source:  educatorlabs.org - addiction prevention lesson plans Addiction Prevention - Education Resources: educatorlabs.org newbeginningsdrugrehab.org justice.gov Learn about Addiction: drugrehab.com    ...

"When students are educated on...

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Dopamine

Addiction

Normal Dopamine molecule binds to a Dopamine receptor (in pink).  After the Dopamine binds, it comes off the receptor and is removed from the synaptic cleft by uptake pumps (also proteins) that reside on the terminal (arrows show the direction of movement).  This process is important because it ensures that not too much Dopamine remains in the synaptic cleft at any one time.  There are neighboring neurons that release another compound called a neuromodulator.  Neuromodulators help to enhance or inhibit neurotransmission that is controlled by neurotransmitters such as Dopamine.   In this case, the neuromodulator is an "endorphin" (in red).  Endorphins bind to opiate receptors (in yellow) which can reside on the post-synaptic cell (shown here) or, in some cases, on...

Normal Dopamine molecule bi...

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Psychoactive

Psychoactive

A psychoactive drug, psychopharmaceutical, or psychotropic is a chemical substance that crosses the blood–brain barrier and acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it affects brain function, resulting in changes in perception, mood, consciousness, cognition, and behavior.  These substances may be used recreationally, to purposefully alter one's consciousness, as entheogens, for ritual, spiritual, and/or shamanic purposes, as a tool for studying or augmenting the mind, or therapeutically as medication. Psychoactive drugs are divided into three groups according to their pharmacological effects: Stimulants ("uppers").  This category comprises substances that wake one up, stimulate the mind, and may even cause euphoria, but do not affect perception. Examples: coffee, tobacco, amphetamine, tea, cacao, guarana, maté, ephedra, khat, and coca. Depressants ("downers"), including sedatives, hypnotics, and narcotics.  This category includes all of the calmative, sleep-inducing, anxiety-reducing, anesthetizing substances, which sometimes induce perceptual changes, such as dream images, and also often evoke feelings of euphoria. Examples: opioids, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and alcohol. Hallucinogens, including psychedelics, dissociatives and deliriants.  This category encompasses all those substances that produce distinct...

A psychoactive drug, psychop...

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ALCOHOL DEPRESSANT

Alcohol is a Depressant

Alcohol is a depressant, which means it slows the function of the central nervous system.  Alcohol actually blocks some of the messages trying to get to the brain.  This alters a person's perceptions, emotions, movement, vision, and hearing. In very small amounts, alcohol can help a person feel more relaxed or less anxious.  More alcohol causes greater changes in the brain, resulting in intoxication.  People who have overused alcohol may stagger, lose their coordination, and slur their speech.  They will probably be confused and disoriented.  Depending on the person, intoxication can make someone very friendly and talkative or very aggressive and angry.  Reaction times are slowed dramatically — which is why people are told not to drink and drive.  People who are intoxicated...

Alcohol is a depressant, whic...

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