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psychosis

Psychosis

Psychosis (Greek "psyche" for mind/soul, and "-osis" for abnormal condition or derangement) refers to an abnormal condition of the mind, and is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as involving a "loss of contact with reality".  People suffering from psychosis are described as psychotic. Psychosis is a loss of contact with reality that usually includes: False beliefs about what is taking place or who one is (delusions) Seeing or hearing things that aren't there (hallucinations) A number of medical problems can cause psychosis, including: Alcohol and certain illegal drugs, both during use and during withdrawal Brain diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and certain chromosomal disorders Brain tumors or cysts Dementia (including Alzheimer's disease) HIV and other infections that affect the brain Some prescription drugs, such as steroids and stimulants Some types of epilepsy Stroke Psychosis (or psychotic symptoms) may also...

Psychosis (Greek "psyche" fo...

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Thought Disorder

Thought Disorder

Thought Disorder underlies multiple mental illnesses. Symptoms: Flight of Ideas – Language may be difficult to understand,  it switches quickly from one unrelated idea to another. Long-winded and very delayed at reaching its goal Schizophasia – (Incoherence or Word salad) Characterized by confused usage of words with no apparent meaning or relationship attached to them.  Words are inappropriately strung together resulting in "gibberish." Alogia – (Poverty of Speech) Deficiency in content of speech compared to what level of information is normally expected. "One word" direct answers without expanding.  Another question must be asked to learn more. Blocking – Interruption of train of speech before completion. Forgets what one is saying (or not recall the topic) mid-speech. Circumstantiality – Speech that is highly detailed and very delayed at reaching its goal. Speaking about many concepts related to the point of...

Thought Disorder underlies mu...

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Schizoaffective Disorder

Schizoaffective Disorder

Schizoaffective disorder has features that resemble both Schizophrenia and Mood (affective) Symptoms. A person who has Schizoaffective Disorder will experience delusions, hallucinations, other symptoms that are characteristic of schizophrenia and significant disturbances in their mood. People who experience more than two weeks of psychotic symptoms in the absence of severe mood disturbances—and then have symptoms of either Depression or Bipolar Disorder—may have Schizoaffective Disorder. Depressive symptoms associated with Schizoaffective disorder can include—but are not limited to— hopelessness helplessness guilt worthlessness disrupted appetite disturbed sleep inability to concentrate, depressed mood (with or without suicidal thoughts). Manic (Bipolar) symptoms associated with Schizoaffective Disorder can include — increased energy decreased sleep (or decreased need for sleep) distractibility fast (“pressured”) speech increased impulsive behaviors (e.g., sexual activities, drug and alcohol abuse, gambling or spending large amounts of money) Sometimes people with other...

Schizoaffective disorder has f...

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